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Virtual Vision vs. Actual Show: Strategies of Visualization in the Book of Ezekiel
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Virtual Vision vs. Actual Show: Strategies of Visualization in the Book of Ezekiel

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Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
This paper addresses different ways of handling and manipulating visuality as displayed by the... mehr
Virtual Vision vs. Actual Show: Strategies of Visualization in the Book of Ezekiel
This paper addresses different ways of handling and manipulating visuality as displayed by the book of Ezekiel in reports on ‘vision’ (especially chs. 1, 10) and so-called ‘sign acts’ (especially chs. 4–5). In the central part, I summarize and update my previous studies, which followed a strictly historical-critical approach combining biblical exegesis with iconography and other ancient Near Eastern background materials. The introduction and conclusion address more theory-driven questions related to visuality, gaze, and visual culture. It is argued that ancient texts may reflect the particular visual environments in which they were authored or transmitted, and that the texts under review here display distinct visual culture backgrounds (roughly: Babylonian, Levantine, Egyptian), which may inform us on different locations of both authors/redactors and audiences; that ancient scribes may have been more or less exposed to such visual regimes, and hence their writings seem to be more or less familiar with visual features; that visualization serves different aims and strategies ofcommunication when vision or ‘sign acts’ are reported; and that the reports also imply different cognitive stances (prophetic insight based on scholarly knowledge vs. persuasive performance)towards the objects of vision which they put on show before their readers’ mind.
Autoreninfos
    • Christoph Uehlinger
    • Dr. theol. Christoph Uehlinger ist Professor für Allgemeine Religionsgeschichte und Religionswissenschaft in Zürich.
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