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Un costrutto discusso: participio pro verbo di modo finito?
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Un costrutto discusso: participio pro verbo di modo finito?

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Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
This paper re-examines a very peculiar and discussed use ofthe Greek participle, which has been... mehr
Un costrutto discusso: participio pro verbo di modo finito?
This paper re-examines a very peculiar and discussed use ofthe Greek participle, which has been recognized by some scholars and defined as ‘participle used as a finite verb’ or, better, as ‘participle used instead of a finite verb’. However, this viewpoint has not been generally accepted. The pattern in question occurs mainly, although not exclusively, in late Greek prose, when a participle is found where we expect, and the syntax would require, a finite verb, both in independent and subordinate clauses. In most cases editors alternatively either choose a more regular reading, if witnessed, or simply emend the text. Therefore we can find not a scanty amount of examples of this construction relegated to (exhaustive) critical apparatuses, as discarded variants, where we see that a participle is actually the only reading or a better attested variant than the correspondent finite verb. In order to strongly argue in favor of the real existence and legitimacy, sometimes disputed, of this use of the participle, the author of the present article intends, firstly, to offer a significant number of new examples gathered from various works of Greek prose. In particular the recensio vetusta of the Alexander Romance, represented by the codex unicus A, will be thoroughly scrutinized, where such examples, amounting to the high concentration of nearly twenty ones, have almost all been corrected and removed from the text by previous editors.Secondly, he aims to show how we can manage to assemble andclassify all the known examples in a few broad categories repeatedlyrecurring with a certain consistency. The author reviews the explanations (ellipsis, anacoluthon) proposed so far, adding some considerations on the prominent role of the participle in the Greek sentence.