Der Artikel wurde erfolgreich hinzugefügt.
Run Before the Tempest
Zeitschriftenartikel
7,00 € *  (D)

inkl. MwSt., versandkostenfrei innerhalb D/A/CH

Sofort als Download lieferbar

Ausgabeformat:

Sprache:
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Harold Macmillan’s “Wind of Change” speech of February 1960 is widely regarded as a defining... mehr
Run Before the Tempest
Harold Macmillan’s “Wind of Change” speech of February 1960 is widely regarded as a defining moment in the history of British decolonisation. Indeed the words themselves have become shorthand for the sweeping changes that transformed the political and ideological landscape of the post-imperial world. What is less understood is the complex reaction of white British settler communities to Macmillan’s message. This essay explores the rhetorical afterlife of the “wind of change” as a means of gauging the settler-colonial dimensions of decolonisation. By tracing its ambivalent usage among settler communities in South Africa, Rhodesia, Kenya, and further afield in Canada, Australia and New Zealand, it is argued that the wind of change acquired distinctive settler connotations as a synonym for the dissolution of white Commonwealth solidarity. The wind of change challenged long held assumptions that had governed the political, social and cultural networks of “Greater Britain”, and confronted its constituent communities with unprecedented dilemmas of self-definition.